Matcha Green Tea Chia Pudding

We have a delicious Matcha recipe to share with you today! Matcha Green Tea Chia Pudding, it’s healthy & easy to make.

Ingredients:

  • 3 TBS chia seeds
  • 2 TBS Organic Matcha
  • 1 1/2 cups coconut milk (almond or soy milk if you prefer)
  • 1/2 cup shredded coconut

Instructions:

  1. In large class container (a mason jar works great) add all ingredients.
  2. Cover with lid & store in refrigerator over night.
  3. Stir after 1st hour or before you go to bed.
  4. Stir again before serving.
  5. Garnish with a handful of shredded coconut or sliced almonds.
  6. Enjoy!

Health Benefits:

CHIA SEEDS – rich in omega 3, excellent source of protein & fiber, rich in iron & vitamins A, B, D & E, lowers cholesterol, helps digestion, and promotes weight loss

MATCHA – boosts metabolism, rich in antioxidants, strengthens immune system, increases energy levels, prevents cancer, enhances concentration, & contains anti-aging properties

Dragon Well: A Closer Look

It’s that time again: time for the Green Teahouse to celebrate the arrival of this year’s Dragon Well harvest! Long Jing (the Chinese name for Dragon Well) is probably the most famous and most commonly imitated . The leaves are unmistakable: light green in color, smooth and glossy, with a crispy texture. When infused, Dragon Well produces an aroma likened to chestnuts or mung beans, and a savory, lightly astringent taste. The secret to this tea’s flavor profile is the pan-frying of the leaves in an iron wok once they are harvested. Pan-frying green tea seals the pores of the leaves so that they better retain their natural oils (which contain their trademark amino acids & enzymes). A fresh cup of premium green tea like Dragon Well can contain as much as 320 miligrams of flavonoids (powerful antioxidants that also acts as a yellowing pigment to the tea leaf) per 8 oz cup, while your average store-bought bottle of green tea contains approximately 30 mg/cup.

Dragon Well originates in the West Lake region of Hangzhou (in the province of Zhejiang). The tea has been produced here for over a thousand years, but it wasn’t nationally recognized until the 18th century, when Read On…